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Tue, 03/20/2012 - 4:35pm -- SRutledge


Salmonella in Curry Powder (Canada)
E. coli In No Name Beef Burgers And Beef Steakettes (Canada)
CDC Study Shows Outbreaks Linked To Imported Foods Increasing
Imported - Food Outbreaks Rise, CDC Says STOP CEO Quoted
Norovirus Suspected In Michigan Hockey Rink Illnesses


Salmonella in Curry Powder (Canada)
OTTAWA, The public warning issued on March 8, 2012 has been expanded to include additional lot codes.
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and G. Dion Foods are warning the public not to consume the Dion brand curry powder described below because the product may be contaminated with Salmonella.

The following Dion brand product is affected by this expanded alert:
Product Organic Curry powder
Size 36 g
UPC 6 20383 02007 7
Lot Code 01B12G & 12A05G

This product has been distributed in Quebec and Ontario.
There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product.
Food contaminated with Salmonella may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with these bacteria may cause salmonellosis, a foodborne illness. In young children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems, salmonellosis may cause serious and sometimes deadly infections. In otherwise healthy people, salmonellosis may cause short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, vomiting, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhoea. Long-term complications may include severe arthritis.
The Manufacturer, G. Dion Foods, Saint-Jerome, Quebec, is voluntarily recalling the affected product from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.
For more information, consumers and industry can call one of the following numbers: G. Dion Foods at 1-877-569-8001

This recall taken from: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2012/20120313be.shtml
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E. coli In No Name Beef Burgers And Beef Steakettes (Canada)
OTTAWA, The public warning issued on February 25, 2012 has been expanded to include additional products and distribution information.
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and New Food Classics are warning the public not to consume the no name beef burgers and beef steakettes described below because the products may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7.

The following products are affected by this alert:
Product no name 12 Beef Burgers Size 1.36 kg
UPC 0 60383 37333 7 Lot Code BB 2012 AL 22 EST 761
Product no name Club Pack Beef Steakettes Size 2.27kg
UPC 0 60383 01321 9 Lot Code BB 2012 AL 22 EST 761

These products have been distributed by Loblaws nationally.
There has been one reported illness associated with the consumption of these products.
Food contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with these bacteria my cause serious and potentially life-threatening illnesses. Symptoms include severe abdominal pain and bloody diarrhoea. Some people may have seizures or strokes and some may need blood transfusions and kidney dialysis. Others may live with permanent kidney damage. In severe cases of illness, people may die.
The manufacturer, New Food Classics, Burlington, ON is voluntarily recalling the affected products from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.
For more information, consumers and industry can call one of the following numbers: New Food Classics at 1-855-344-1825

This recall taken from: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2012/20120313e.shtml
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CDC Study Shows Outbreaks Linked To Imported Foods Increasing
ATLANTA,-- Fish and spices the most common sources
Foodborne disease outbreaks caused by imported food appeared to rise in 2009 and 2010, and nearly half of the outbreaks implicated foods imported from areas which previously had not been associated with outbreaks, according to research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, presented today at the International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases in Atlanta.
"It's too early to say if the recent numbers represent a trend, but CDC officials are analyzing information from 2011 and will continue to monitor for these outbreaks in the future," said Hannah Gould, Ph.D., an epidemiologist in CDC's Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases and the lead author of the study.
CDC experts reviewed outbreaks reported to CDC's Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System from 2005-2010 for implicated foods that were imported into the United States. During that five-year period, 39 outbreaks and 2,348 illnesses were linked to imported food from 15 countries. Of those outbreaks, nearly half (17) occurred in 2009 and 2010. Overall, fish (17 outbreaks) were the most common source of implicated imported foodborne disease outbreaks, followed by spices (six outbreaks including five from fresh or dried peppers). Nearly 45 percent of the imported foods causing outbreaks came from Asia.

This article continues at: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/cdc-study-shows-outbreaks-linked-to-imported-foods-increasing-2012-03-14
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Imported - Food Outbreaks Rise, CDC Says
**STOP CEO Deirdre Schlunegger Quoted Below**

By Timothy W. Martin

Outbreaks of illness linked to imported food have risen since the late 1990s, casting a spotlight on federal inspection standards for fish, produce and other foods brought in from abroad.
The 39 outbreaks from imported food reported between 2005 and 2010 represent a small fraction of total cases of food-borne illnesses such as salmonella or E. coli, according to the data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention presented Wednesday. But the rise in imported-food outbreaks—mostly from fish and spices—highlights gaps in the food-safety system that a sweeping new law is intended to address.
CDC researchers found 6.5 outbreaks from foreign foods a year, on average, between 2005 and 2010—more than double the average of 2.7 outbreaks annually between 1998 and 2004.
Of the 39 outbreaks between 2005 and 2010, nearly half—17—occurred in 2009 and 2010.
The foods, including fish, oysters, cheese, sprouts and seven other types of products, were shipped from 15 countries. Nearly 45% of those foods originated from Asia. Most people were sickened with salmonella or histamine fish poisoning, a bacterial disease contracted from eating spoiled dark-flesh fish that causes rashes, diarrhea, sweating, headaches and vomiting. The outbreaks led to 2,348 cases of illness, the CDC said.
Among the largest of those outbreaks was one in 2008 linked to jalapeño and serrano peppers from Mexico contaminated with salmonella. More than 1,400 people were sickened and more than 280 were hospitalized with salmonella in 43 states.
Other major outbreaks reviewed in the study were a 2007 recall of Veggie Booty, a puffed rice snack that was found to contain contaminated raw materials from China that led to 52 cases of salmonella in 17 states, and a 2010 outbreak of typhoid fever tied to frozen fruit pulp that originated in Guatemala.
The number of outbreaks reported is likely underestimated because of inconsistent country-of-origin labeling, Hannah Gould, a CDC epidemiologist and lead author of the study, said in a phone interview. "We don't always know where food comes from," Dr. Gould said. The full study will be published later this year.
The CDC estimates more than 3,000 Americans die annually from food poisoning and 48 million are sickened.
The amount of food imported has nearly doubled in the past decade, to 10.7 million shipments in 2009 from 5.6 million shipments in 2002, according to the Food and Drug Administration, which inspects shipments. Nearly 16% of food consumed by Americans comes from abroad, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
The FDA said it inspected about 1,000 of the 254,000 foreign-based food-processing facilities during its 2011 fiscal year, but it expects to increase its number of inspections as part of a sweeping food-safety law signed last year by President Barack Obama, an FDA spokeswoman said.
Foreign food companies are allowed to pass inspections by paying a third-party inspector to visit their facilities, said Deirdre Schlunegger, chief executive of STOP Foodborne Illness Inc., a nonprofit pushing for stronger inspection regulations. She wants FDA officials to conduct the on-site investigations.
"There's a lot of room for improvement," Ms. Schlunegger said. "We need to see more inspections, more consistent inspections."

This article taken from: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303863404577281862618623368.html?mod=googlenews_wsj
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Norovirus Suspected In Michigan Hockey Rink Illnesses
TAYLOR, Mich. (AP) — Health officials say a norovirus is suspected of causing up to 30 high school-aged hockey players to get sick while at a suburban Detroit rink for a tournament.The Taylor Fire Department says the youth hockey players from different teams were at the Taylor Sportsplex in Taylor on Sunday night when some began vomiting.
Some were taken for treatment by ambulance and others were taken by private vehicles to area hospitals. The city-owned complex was shut down so air and water tests could be performed.
The building also was being cleaned and could reopen Wednesday.
Norovirus is part of a family of viruses that are spread person-to-person and cause flu-like symptoms including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and stomach cramping.

This article taken from: http://www.necn.com/03/13/12/Norovirus-suspected-in-Mich-hockey-rink-/landing_health.html?&apID=bea84faa3c2947e1bb514c3449990430

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